M&M trot the globe

Posts tagged “Nha Trang

Haggle, haggle!


At the bottom of the staircase leading up to the mega statue, which commemorates one of the defining battles that led to the independence of Vietnam in Dien Bien Phu, we met two Germans looking to change any Lao Kip we had for their Vietnamese Dong. However we had exchanged our money before crossing the border, but we did spend about half an hour exchanging travel tips as we were heading in opposite directions.

The German couple said that Vietnam had been interesting, but lamented the number of rip-offs and scams they had experienced; cautioning that prices in Vietnam are not set and overcharging is rife. They mentioned feeling like walking dollar signs, constantly being overcharged and having to haggle over items which one would normally expect to have a fixed price, or even despite a fixed price had been given, e.g. at the hairdresser.

To survive here, you really need to know how to haggle and barter. In the two biggest cities Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh, comradeship seems a thing of the past. Now it is all about the money – every man for himself.

At hotels prices may decrease as much as 50% if you know how to haggle; everything from bus tickets, which ranged from 250,000 Dong (or 10 Euros), at one travel agency to 170,000 Dong (7 Euros) two doors down, is negotiable. The price depends on what you look like i.e. how you are dressed, and how well travelled you look (or gullible the salesperson thinks you might be).

One morning as we were checking out the statue of Lenin, which is down the road from Ho Chi Minh’s mausoleum in Hanoi, a man cycled up with a stack of books. He offered to sell us the Lonely Planet Bangladesh and Sri Lanka guides (which we will need in a few weeks). His asking price? 500,000 Dong (20 Euro). Now that’s what we call a rip-off! In HCMC, we were quoted 60,000 for the Bangladesh guide. In Vietnam, we soon learned that you really have to shop around!

Advertisements

Vietnamese Food


Unfortunately we experienced very bad weather during our travels in Vietnam, so sampling the local cuisine became one way of passing the time in the depressing cold of Hanoi and helped us to wait out the rain from Hué to Nha Trang.

Some of the standard fare we sampled included Phó, the national dish of Vietnam, which seems to be everyone’s first choice for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Phó is a broth, which contains white rice noodles; depending on the cook they may be thin or thick. Meat (pork or beef) is also included and green leafy vegetables. One also receives lime to squeeze into the bowl. The best Phó we sampled was about 10 minutes after our arrival in the northern town of Den Bien Phu.

Our favorite dish in Vietnam has to be the spring rolls. In each restaurant they are a bit different. The extra salty spring rolls in Hué were particularly good as were the fresh spring rolls, which are uncooked (sometimes called summer rolls). In Hoi An we were able to sample White Rose, a local specialty made from shrimp and rice paper.

Two other great things about Vietnamese cuisine are the baked goods – fantastic patisseries all over the country serve fresh baguettes (the French did do one good thing for the region) and the famously thick, dark and incredibly strong Vietnamese coffee. It is perfect for that caffeine injection in the morning and given the pace of most Vietnamese cities, you need it (well I need it, unfortunately I was not successful in converting Martin into a coffee drinker).

Finally if you are game, try the local Dalat wine. It’s not the best wine we have ever had, but we did manage to polish of a bottle with a couple of baguettes by the river in Hoi An one evening at sunset. We can also recommend La Rue and Saigon beer. In Ho Chi Minh we found that most of the Germans, being the bargain hunters that they are, had done their due diligence and discovered that the cheapest place to get beer was a Bangladeshi restaurant in the backpacker ghetto. At 8000 dong or less than 30 Euro cents for a 450 ml bottle of beer, developing a ‘Bavarian Belly’ is incredibly cheap.